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Brexit- The Final Countdown  

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Deal or No Deal?

British politicians seem to be running around Westminster in a frantic hurry trying to get some sort of deal over Brexit with an organisation they are trying to leave.

So does a deal really matter? We have a two way trade with our neighbouring EU countries which is more beneficial to them than it is to us, so it’s in their interests for it to continue.

If a foreign government seeks to stop this trade, then it is committing a hostile act against a foreign power.

British trade rolls on and rolls off in the Channel ports and if the Brussels’ bureaucrats try to order a halt, then they should consider what may happen next.

The British possess Europe’s largest navy, and certainly its best trained and most experienced at resolving international incidents.

If a hostile country seeks to stop Britain’s trade then one likely scenario is the declaration of a naval exclusion zone across the North Sea and out into the Atlantic.

Any ship approaching an EU port will be turned away by British warships, and any leaving will be open to attack.

Brussels, not having a fleet of its own would have to go to the Russians cap in hand asking them to break the blockade in a similar style to the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis.

The price of any Russian help would likely to be very high.

In November 1940 they asked their German allies, in return for continuing help, for control of the entrance to the Baltic so as to give them access to their own ports in winter time.

Hitler refused, and in 1945 as the war neared its end British PM Churchill ordered General Montgomery to position the British Army so as to block the Russians from advancing into Denmark.

Would Trump back Britain in a full scale nuclear stand off if the Brussels’ bureaucrats were to stoop so low?

 

The three River-class patrol vessels of the Fishery Protection Squadron, HMS Mersey, HMS Severn and HMS Tyne (foreground) exercising off the coast of Cornwall. The Fishery Protection Squadron (FPS) enforces UK and EU fisheries legislation in order to ensure the long term sustainability of the UK fishing grounds. In addition, the three UK based Ships are the only warships on permanent patrol around the UK, contributing to the policing of UK waters and delivering an intrinsic element of the UK’s Maritime Security.

HMS Tyne Fishery Protection Squadron-Crown photo credit

 It would certainly silence his critics at home and abroad if he did so.

In 1974 Britain joined the EU to become part of a trading block. The British have decided to leave in order to trade elsewhere.

Britain doesn’t need a deal with an organisation which it is leaving.

Whereas the EU certainly does need to make sure it stays on extremely good terms with Europe’s most heavily armed country.

Britain is an island, set in a silver sea, strategically placed so as to dominate the shipping lanes over which 90 % of the EU’s exports must travel.

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